Tools and Equipment To Make Sea Glass Jewelry

Sea glass has a way of making the creativity in all of us reveal itself. Being such a beautiful medium naturally leads most of us wanting to create jewelry. Making sea glass jewelry is a craft that is friendly to all skill levels. It can be very intimidating trying to figure out where to start though.

Over the years, I have been asked about tools and equipment that can get you started in making sea glass jewelry. To share that answer with everyone, I have compiled a list of the tools and equipment you need to make sea glass jewelry. I have broken the list down to three levels so you can see what items you might want to get next while progressing your skill level. This list is just tools and equipment, the supplies such as wire or findings you will need is not included. If you are just getting started or buying for someone just getting their feet wet, I recommend starting with the “beginner” items then progressing to the items in the “intermediate” list and so on. If you would like to skip right to the “intermediate” list, you will also need the items in the “beginner” list and so on. Some items are upgraded items from one level to the next. For example, the smith torch is an upgrade from the butane torch – so if you were to be purchasing all the items on all the lists, you don’t need both of those. Some items like types of polish and particular bits that are prefered for your flex shaft are not included in this list. These types of specifics are usually personal preference and chosen by the jeweler after their own trial and error. If you have any questions or if you believe I have missed an item you think should be on here, please comment below!

If you are interested in an Orion welder, I am a representative for the company and would be happy to assist you in choosing a welder that would work best for you. If you purchase directly from the company, please let them know I directed you to them.

Beginner - Wire Wrapping or Drilling

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5 Piece Jewelry Plier Set

with travel case and plier rack

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Cutters

flush cut up to 16 gauge

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Dremel

variable speed rotary tool kit

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Diamond Bits

30 pack of 1mm bits

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Drill Press

by Dremel

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Face Mask

20 pack

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Safety Glasses

clear anti-fog lenses

Intermediate - Beginning Bezel

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Butane Torch

with adjustable flame

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Butane Fuel

12 pack

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Pickling Compound

granular dry acid

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Flux

self pickling

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Solder Block

6in. x 6in.

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Hammer

Dual head brass/nylon

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Steel Tweezers

3-pack locking and straight

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Copper Tweezers

needed for handling pickle

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Mandrel

Sizes 1-16

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Soldering Stand

tripod with mesch screen

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Third Hand

Jon’s favorite bench tool ;)

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Bezel Rocker

a simple and essential tool

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Saw

adjustable frame

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Saw Blades

for precision cuts

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Burnisher

for bezel settings

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Cut Lube

multiple uses

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Ultrasonic

cleaning machine

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Crock Pot

to hold your pickle solution

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Hand Files

12 pack

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Tumbler

with stainless steel shot

Professional

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Little Smith Torch

with gas hoses and 5 tips

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Oxygen

20 cf empty tank

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Oxygen Regulator

for large 20cf tank

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Propane Regulator

for small disposable tanks

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Parallel Pliers

flat nose

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Flashback Arrestor

for oxygen and propane (fuel)

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Jewelers Bench

with metal work pan

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Flex Shaft

with accessory kit

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Torch Holder

magnetic

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Bench Vice

tilts and rotates

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Ring Clamp

double sided

Elite Professional

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Heated Ultrasonic

with digital timer

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Rolling Mill

5 rollers

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Steam Cleaner

1.25 gallon stainless steel

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Polishing Kit

by Dura-BULL

6 thoughts on “Tools and Equipment To Make Sea Glass Jewelry

  1. Andi Clarke says:

    Thank you so much for sharing this, I’ve been assembling different pins on different aspects of silversmithing, but none as comprehensive as this one specifically for sea glass. Thank you. New Year’s project – kick up my jewelry making by some serious notches.

  2. Shannon Russell says:

    Hi Meg!

    Thank you for posting your list! I am beyond the beginner and intermediate, and into the professional “almost there” section. Presently, I use a Blazer torch that just runs on a butane refill. If I get the Smith Little Torch, do I need all of the attachments you suggested? For example, how many tanks do I get, do I use oxygen only, or acetyline and oxygen, all of the connectors, or just some (one said it was for propane).

    I love seeing you on Instagram and am so happy for all of your accomplishments, personally and professionally! Thank you for sharing your hard-earned wisdom with those of us continuing to pursue our dreams. :)

    Take care,

    Shannon Russell

    • Meg Carter says:

      Hi Shannon!
      Thanks so much for your kind words. :) I am so glad that you found the list helpful. I have been in your shoes and it is confusing to know what to do/buy next to advance to the next level. To answer your question… The smith torch I recommend using oxygen and propane. Acetylene burns off very dirty. Propane although not great to breath in either, it is cleaner than acetylene. You will need to get an oxygen tank and regulator. The propane you can get the smaller regulator and use the little camping tanks (I didn’t have them on the list because I don’t think you can buy and ship them online, I couldn’t find them, you will have to get them locally). Depending on how much you use your torch, you will go through them fairly slow. For example, I go through a small camping propane tank every 2 months or so. The oxygen, I have to refill about every 2 years. If you use the small oxygen tanks though, you will go through them quickly, like every 2 weeks. As far as the flashback regulators, they are just a safety precaution. I don’t have them, probably should. Speaking of safety. You may want to look into your homeowners insurance. Bringing these tanks into the house is a big no no for most insurance policies. I have a separate insurance for the business. I hope this helps to answer your questions. If not, let me know. Best of luck! :)

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